Carolyn Einertson, who was mentored by Stephen Nickerson of the Department of Animal and Dairy Science, won first place in the oral presentation section of the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Undergraduate Research Symposium with her talk, “Using Pre-Calving Mammary Secretions to Predict Udder Infection Status in Dairy Heifers.” CAES News
Carolyn Einertson, who was mentored by Stephen Nickerson of the Department of Animal and Dairy Science, won first place in the oral presentation section of the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Undergraduate Research Symposium with her talk, “Using Pre-Calving Mammary Secretions to Predict Udder Infection Status in Dairy Heifers.”
CAES students highlight research achievements at CAES Undergraduate Research Symposium
Almost 50 University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) undergraduate students showcased their research projects and competed in the seventh annual CAES Undergraduate Research Symposium on April 11.
Switchgrass CAES News
Switchgrass
Scientists work to produce poplar trees, switchgrass that can efficiently convert to biofuels
A research team led by the University of Georgia has discovered that manipulation of the same gene in poplar trees and switchgrass produced plants that grow better and are more efficiently converted to biofuels.
Chef Dan Barber and Row 7 Seeds employee Charlotte Douglas tour the greenhouses at Whippoorwill Farms in Winterville, Georgia while Barber was in Athens to speak at the University of Georgia Tuesday, April 10. CAES News
Chef Dan Barber and Row 7 Seeds employee Charlotte Douglas tour the greenhouses at Whippoorwill Farms in Winterville, Georgia while Barber was in Athens to speak at the University of Georgia Tuesday, April 10.
Chef Dan Barber believes the future of local food lies in locally produced seeds
In just under two decades, the local food movement has changed the way many people think about their food. Now it’s time for the next step: a local seed system.
University of Georgia Professor Paul Raymer has served Georgia agriculture as a variety tester, a soybean specialist, a canola breeder and a turfgrass breeder. For the past 15 years, he has focused on developing improved cultivars of seashore paspalum, tall fescue and creeping bentgrass for high-stress environments. CAES News
University of Georgia Professor Paul Raymer has served Georgia agriculture as a variety tester, a soybean specialist, a canola breeder and a turfgrass breeder. For the past 15 years, he has focused on developing improved cultivars of seashore paspalum, tall fescue and creeping bentgrass for high-stress environments.
Crop and soil sciences professor's career rooted in Green Revolution
More than 40 years ago, a young man from Arkansas decided to become an agriculture major because "it was the beginning of the Green Revolution, and agriculture had a bright future." Today that man, University of Georgia professor Paul Raymer, has served Georgia agriculture as a variety tester, a soybean specialist, a canola breeder and a turfgrass breeder.
Students in the UGA Horticulture Club prepare for their Spring Plant Sale, which will be held April 6-8 and April 12-15. CAES News
Students in the UGA Horticulture Club prepare for their Spring Plant Sale, which will be held April 6-8 and April 12-15.
Spring plant sales, Plantapalooza make for one-stop shopping
Spring is here, which means it’s time to plant summer gardens. Through plant sales and the annual Plantapalooza event on Saturday, April 14, the Trial Gardens at the University of Georgia; the State Botanical Garden of Georgia; the UGA Horticulture Club; the Plant Breeding, Genetics and Genomics (PBGG) Graduate Student Association; and the Plant Biology Graduate Student Association (PBGSA) make plant-buying easy.
Thinning pine stands benefits the timber stand and the owner. Reducing stand density reduces competition for nutrients, space and light and improves the vigor, growth rate and overall quality of the remaining trees. CAES News
Thinning pine stands benefits the timber stand and the owner. Reducing stand density reduces competition for nutrients, space and light and improves the vigor, growth rate and overall quality of the remaining trees.
Experts to host Agroforestry and Wildlife Field Day in Griffin, Georgia, Sept. 20
Pine straw production, timber sales and wildlife management will top the list of topics at the Agroforestry and Wildlife Field Day slated for Thursday, Sept. 20, at the University of Georgia’s Westbrook Research Farm in Griffin, Georgia.