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Professor and UGA Extension Entomologist Will Hudson projects images of a beneficial predator from his microscope during a presentation on beneficial insects. CAES News
Professor and UGA Extension Entomologist Will Hudson projects images of a beneficial predator from his microscope during a presentation on beneficial insects.
Nature's Helpers
While the use of beneficial insects and other biocontrols for agricultural pest management hasn’t gained widespread usage in open field production, some Georgia farmers are using natural control methods in greenhouse and high-tunnel production.
Thinning pine stands benefits the timber stand and the owner. Reducing stand density reduces competition for nutrients, space and light and improves the vigor, growth rate and overall quality of the remaining trees. CAES News
Thinning pine stands benefits the timber stand and the owner. Reducing stand density reduces competition for nutrients, space and light and improves the vigor, growth rate and overall quality of the remaining trees.
Timber Stands
A forested stand with fewer quality trees is often healthier than a forested stand with a greater density. Small-acreage landowners should consider using the Timber Stand Improvement Method.
Ruqayah Bhuiyan, a junior studying horticulture at the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, spent spring 2018 interning at NASA, where she worked on methods to produce fresh produce for astronauts. CAES News
Ruqayah Bhuiyan, a junior studying horticulture at the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, spent spring 2018 interning at NASA, where she worked on methods to produce fresh produce for astronauts.
NASA Internship
It all started with a movie many people haven’t seen. About 10 years ago, Ruqayah Bhuiyan sat down to watch “Sunshine,” a movie about astronauts flying to the sun. Amid all of the high drama, fission bombs and personal conflict aboard the ship, there was a garden.
Jason Wallace, an assistant professor at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES), has received one of nine 2018 New Innovator in Food and Agriculture Research Awards from the Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research (FFAR). CAES News
Jason Wallace, an assistant professor at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES), has received one of nine 2018 New Innovator in Food and Agriculture Research Awards from the Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research (FFAR).
FFAR Innovator Award
Jason Wallace, an assistant professor at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES), has received one of nine 2018 New Innovator in Food and Agriculture Research Awards from the Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research (FFAR).
Blueberries growing on the Alapaha farm in Alapaha, Georgia in this file photo. CAES News
Blueberries growing on the Alapaha farm in Alapaha, Georgia in this file photo.
IPM Grant
The University of Georgia has been awarded a $2 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture National Institute of Food and Agriculture to develop organic methods of controlling the Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD). 
University of Georgi Crop and Soil Sciences Professor Wayne Parrott and Assistant Professor Jason Wallace are working with the carnivorous water plant bladderwort in hopes that its unique genetic structure can shed some light on ways to reduce crosstalk between new genes during advanced plant breeding. CAES News
University of Georgi Crop and Soil Sciences Professor Wayne Parrott and Assistant Professor Jason Wallace are working with the carnivorous water plant bladderwort in hopes that its unique genetic structure can shed some light on ways to reduce crosstalk between new genes during advanced plant breeding.
Bladderwort Research
With the advent of CRISPR technologies and other precise genome editing methods, it has become faster and easier for crop scientists to breed new varieties. But there are still a few technical roadblocks that need to be overcome.
Agricultural policy expert Robert Paarlberg, center left, and Dean Sam Pardue of the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, center, congratulate the winners of the 2018 D.W. Brooks Faculty Awards for Excellence including, from left, Professor Yen-Con Hung, Associate Professor Kari Turner, Professor Dan Suiter, Senior Public Service Associate Lisa Jordan, and Professor Qingguo “Jack” Huang. CAES News
Agricultural policy expert Robert Paarlberg, center left, and Dean Sam Pardue of the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, center, congratulate the winners of the 2018 D.W. Brooks Faculty Awards for Excellence including, from left, Professor Yen-Con Hung, Associate Professor Kari Turner, Professor Dan Suiter, Senior Public Service Associate Lisa Jordan, and Professor Qingguo “Jack” Huang.
D.W. Brooks Lecture
Whether it’s an argument for slow food or technologically advanced agriculture, most people oversimplify the narratives surrounding the modern food system.
Grow It Know It students Lucy Gibson, a junior in the Clarke Central High School; Jean Ayala Figueroa, an 8th grader at Clarke Middle School; Destiny Strickland, 8th grade at Coile Middle School and Mara Smith, a freshman at Clarke Central High School represent the Grow It Know It program celebrate Georgia Organic's Golden Radish Awards on Oct. 22. CAES News
Grow It Know It students Lucy Gibson, a junior in the Clarke Central High School; Jean Ayala Figueroa, an 8th grader at Clarke Middle School; Destiny Strickland, 8th grade at Coile Middle School and Mara Smith, a freshman at Clarke Central High School represent the Grow It Know It program celebrate Georgia Organic's Golden Radish Awards on Oct. 22.
Grow It Know It
Anyone who has ever been to a meal prepared by Clarke County Schools’ Grow It Know It students knows that the program is special, and now the state knows as well. 
Wildlife management efforts on small acreage are not in vain. These plots may not forever hold a flock of turkeys, a covey of quail, or a trophy buck, but they often become important parts of these animals' range. The photo of this buck was taken by a wildlife camera on a 7-acre lot. CAES News
Wildlife management efforts on small acreage are not in vain. These plots may not forever hold a flock of turkeys, a covey of quail, or a trophy buck, but they often become important parts of these animals' range. The photo of this buck was taken by a wildlife camera on a 7-acre lot.
Managing Wildlife
While implementing habitat improvements on a small property can provide homes to small mammals, songbirds, reptiles and amphibians, the home ranges of large mammals and several birds often encapsulate several hundred acres.
This photo shows what a crop looks like when it's protected with row covers for four weeks (left) versus being left without row covers (right). CAES News
This photo shows what a crop looks like when it's protected with row covers for four weeks (left) versus being left without row covers (right).
Row Covers
Row covers, material used to protect plants from the cold and wind, can also protect squash from disease-carrying squash bugs and other insect pests, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Plant Pathologist Elizabeth Little.