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Irrigation at work on the UGA Tifton Campus. It is May 23 and has been a couple of weeks since South Georgia has received substantial rainfall. With little to no rain in the forecast, farmers are utilizing irrigation to water their crops. CAES News
Irrigation at work on the UGA Tifton Campus. It is May 23 and has been a couple of weeks since South Georgia has received substantial rainfall. With little to no rain in the forecast, farmers are utilizing irrigation to water their crops.
Warming weather
Georgia temperatures are rising, and the weather is only going to get hotter with little rain in the forecast. That’s not good news for Georgia’s cotton producers who are in the middle of planting this year’s crop, says Jared Whitaker, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension cotton agronomist.
Scout schools will be offered at the UGA Tifton Campus Conference Center in Tifton, Georgia, as well as the Southeast Research and Education Center in Midville, Georgia. CAES News
Scout schools will be offered at the UGA Tifton Campus Conference Center in Tifton, Georgia, as well as the Southeast Research and Education Center in Midville, Georgia.
Scout Schools
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension has scheduled two insect scouting schools for Georgia’s cotton, peanut and soybean farmers, both set for June.
Georgia sod producers are scrambling to provide more zoysia this season. The popularity of the grass coupled with the wet growing season has their supplies running low. UGA turfgrass researchers Paul Raymer (left) and Alfredo Martinez (right) are shown inspecting a roll of sod with retired UGA Extension turfgrass specialist Gil Landry. CAES News
Georgia sod producers are scrambling to provide more zoysia this season. The popularity of the grass coupled with the wet growing season has their supplies running low. UGA turfgrass researchers Paul Raymer (left) and Alfredo Martinez (right) are shown inspecting a roll of sod with retired UGA Extension turfgrass specialist Gil Landry.
Zoysia Shortage
Zoysiagrass is gaining in popularity throughout Georgia. Couple increased popularity with a wet and overcast 2018 growing season and some Georgia sod producers are seeing a decline in their inventory.
Pine trees toppled over after Hurricane Michael in Wilcox County, Georgia. CAES News
Pine trees toppled over after Hurricane Michael in Wilcox County, Georgia.
No Relief
Agricultural producers in the region damaged most by Hurricane Michael are struggling to recover from this disaster without additional federal assistance, even as the 2019 spring planting season is now fully underway. A recent survey of Cooperative Extension county agents in Florida and Georgia showed that there is a great deal of continued uncertainty about future production in affected areas.
A group photo of the speakers at the UGA-Tifton centennial celebration included, from left: USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture Director Scott Angle, UGA CAES Dean Sam Pardue, UGA President Jere Morehead, Georgia Agriculture Commissioner Gary Black, UGA-Tifton Assistant Dean Joe West, Congressman Austin Scott (GA-08) and USDA Southeast Area Director Archie Tucker. CAES News
A group photo of the speakers at the UGA-Tifton centennial celebration included, from left: USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture Director Scott Angle, UGA CAES Dean Sam Pardue, UGA President Jere Morehead, Georgia Agriculture Commissioner Gary Black, UGA-Tifton Assistant Dean Joe West, Congressman Austin Scott (GA-08) and USDA Southeast Area Director Archie Tucker.
Centennial Celebration
For 100 years, the University of Georgia Tifton campus has been committed to agricultural research that benefits the state of Georgia and the world. As the campus turns the page to its next century, UGA-Tifton is focused on cultivating the next generation of agricultural leaders who will help feed and clothe a growing population.
A push mower used to mow turfgrass. CAES News
A push mower used to mow turfgrass.
Green Up
While many warm-season turfgrass species have shown signs of significant green-up, some grasses and locations still have an appearance of being dormant or slowly transitioning.  
CAES Dean Sam Pardue, left, presented Frank McGill with the Medallion of Honor during special event on Thursday, May 2, on the UGA Tifton campus. CAES News
CAES Dean Sam Pardue, left, presented Frank McGill with the Medallion of Honor during special event on Thursday, May 2, on the UGA Tifton campus.
Medallion of Honor
Frank McGill, 92, affectionally known throughout the Georgia agricultural community as “Mr. Peanut,” received the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences’ Medallion of Honor during a private event on Thursday, May 2, on the UGA Tifton campus.
While Americans are familiar with one or two varieties of peanut, farmers in other parts of the world have been able to develop hundreds of varieties thanks to the peanut's natural ability to shuffle its two distinct subgenomes to produce new traits. These are some of the peanuts grown by the Caiabí people who live on the Ilha Grande, Mato Grosso, Brazil. The peanut crop is very important for them and they cultivate diverse types, each one with its own use, name and story. Photo by Fábio de Oliveira Freitas. CAES News
While Americans are familiar with one or two varieties of peanut, farmers in other parts of the world have been able to develop hundreds of varieties thanks to the peanut's natural ability to shuffle its two distinct subgenomes to produce new traits. These are some of the peanuts grown by the Caiabí people who live on the Ilha Grande, Mato Grosso, Brazil. The peanut crop is very important for them and they cultivate diverse types, each one with its own use, name and story. Photo by Fábio de Oliveira Freitas.
Mother of Peanut
Working to understand the genetics of peanut disease resistance and yield, researchers led by scientists at the University of Georgia have uncovered the peanut’s unlikely and complicated evolution.
Glenn Burton examines grass cultivars being grown on the UGA Tifton campus. CAES News
Glenn Burton examines grass cultivars being grown on the UGA Tifton campus.
Georgia Groundbreakers
You may never have heard the name Glenn Burton before, but you’ve almost certainly seen his handiwork. In a career spanning more than six decades, most of which was spent as a professor at the University of Georgia’s Tifton campus, Burton established himself as one of the world’s most prolific agricultural scientists. You don’t have to search long to find one of his creations.
Too much water can hurt lawns and crop production just as much as not enough water would do. CAES News
Too much water can hurt lawns and crop production just as much as not enough water would do.
Irrigation App
University of Georgia scientists have created a new app to help Georgia vegetable growers irrigate their crops more efficiently.